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was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
, they are children who really didn't have a choice. they are here. they have been educated in america. we are trying to give them a legal status that does not allow a fear of deportation, and it allows them to go to college or school, allows them to stay here they want to. if they want to become citizens, they can apply and get in line and abide by theaw as it is today. we don't change the law would prohibit them. but we don't give them the cut in line for the people who have awaited for years to get that green card for the citizenship. gerri: switching gears here a little bit. he wrote an op-ed calling on washington. calling on congress and the president. not to raise taxes on small business operators. what would you like to see happen? >> i think we are going to rack this fragile economy if we raise taxes on the people who are creating jobs. they want to create jobs. we need to give the people and small business a stability and predictability. they need to know what to expect. all the president talks about his more taxes and more taxes. on top of health care, that is why we have not gotten any bet
is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
superintendent in nevada. richard's passion lies in advancing educational equity and opportunity for all and we are very lucky to have him here with us here in san francisco. our superintendent of schools, richard karunda >> melinda, thank you so much for that wonderful introduction. i want to welcome you all to a sunny september morning in san francisco, i hope you have your sun block and i also want to welcome home our lieutenant governor, our former mayor, gachb newsom. it's good to see you, sir. yesterday was a really powerful experience for us in san francisco. we've made a commitment that by the end of october every 6th through 12th grader in san francisco city public schools will have had the opportunity to see bully and not only view that documentary but also go through a rich can urriculum from our teachers understanding the lessons from that movie. we all know a movie in and of itself doesn't make a difference, but i will tell you, we didn't start our approach to understanding it with the movie bully. we're very proud 234 san francisco that we have had an approach based on restore
graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a
mc kenzie, long-time consulting education. that's my major private practice where i develop education proposals including cross cultural, sports education exchange programs. also the past 11 years been teaching in the public high schools here in san francisco. i'm here once again on behalf of our students and high school college and all of our youth. as i propose to you and the warriors, everyone involved, for this arena to include within it -- within the arena itself a high school education and career development classroom which could be accessible all year round. arenas in this country, this is a perfect example and opportunity to create a model frat silt. d -- facility. i believe sports is [speaker not understood]. to include a high school classroom which these are inherently educational methodologies that can be utilized and expanded. as we all know the education system in this country is far beyond -- well, is far behind a lot of countries in the world today because of our priorities, which i believe needs to be improved dramatically. through the initiation of a classroom [speake
cuts that have now educators ringing the alarm. they warn of increased class sizes, the elimination of after-school and summer school programs, libraries could close, all this as the u.s. tries to close an achievement gap. joining me now to continue our education nation conversation, world-renowned educator dr. steve perry, also host of tv one's "save my son." steve, it's great to have you here. the secretary of education, arne duncan, has said that 9 million students would be affected by the cuts including nearly 2 million that are already living in this country in poverty. when we talk about special education needs for the kids of our country, we're essentially about to take away resources from the students that need it most. however, we're not talking enough about that. >> one of the reasons why there's even a conversation about cuts is not so much because there's less money coming in, it's because of so much money going out. where we spend the most amount of money in education is on personnel. me and the benefits that you pay us. many of us receive in some cases 30% to 50% of ou
and celebrated persons in recovery and helped to educate and inform others about the process of recovery. we know that almost 1 in 10 americans struggle with a substance use disorder and that about 1 in 5 americans has a mental health problem. treatment and recovery are the pathway forward for these individuals, a pathway that leads to improved family relationships, health and well-being, hope for the future, and purpose in the sustainment of their recovery. as we hear and see their stories, we learn that recovery happens through many different pathways and that, in every marked by care, acceptance, and respect. this year marks the 22nd year of recovery month , and this year we have broadened it to incorporate recovery from mental health problems along with substance use disorders. recovery should be the common goal, whether one is dealing with mental or substance use disorders, or both. i encourage you to visit recoverymonth.gov to learn more about the celebrations, events, and the 2011 theme: join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone. this is an important effort, to try to make s
, where they need the revenue for education and other good causes. >> i know you don't agree with that, but explain to me why you don't agree. >> sure, a lot of folks call this powerball fever. a better name for it is "the swindle flu." powerball, you name any other lottery program. i mean, this is a government program that is based on pushing citizens into deeper personal debt. it is a classic gimmick, and has become the public voice of american government today. and it is a lie. when people say they don' play this as an investment, according to the consumer federation of america, you have one in five americans who think the most practical way to build wealth is to play the lottery. >> yeah, but terry rich -- >> return to america's working class. we turned america's working class into its lottery class. >> okay, terry rich, what do you say to that? you have no way, do you running a lottery, of knowing who is buying these tickets? their demographic, their wealth, anything. you don't really know if they are very poor people who are spending much more than they can afford on a weekly bas
that will improve their schools and education? once again, the teachers' unions say no. we await word from a judge in a key case on this very issue. >>> but first up, we'll look at the economy, stocks and the federal reserve. a quick note on the economy, a 2.7% gdp revision today. it looks okay on the outside. stronger housing investment, i like that. decent corporate profits, i like that a lot. there was's big business inventory bulge. that will -- consumer spending weaker than many expected growing just 1.4%. finally most importantly and difficult, business investment fell. equipment software fell, building structures fell, we've seen some lousy numbers on the durable goods and manufacture odds, it's a very bad sign that business is not in good shape. not in recession, but kind of this 1.5 to 2% thing that's driving me crazy. >>> let's turn to the fed a front-page "wall street journal" story suggests that maybe more fed stimulus may be coming. the question -- do we need it. here is lee hoskins. lee, welcome back. do we need more federal reserve stimulus? >> well, no, larry, we don't. how many ti
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
them education made this new economy. so it wasn't that the government was spending. government and intentionally in a sense was restructuring the economy making it prepared for the post war period. as also an interesting book in the period in the 30's the government was actually giving a lot of investment and that increased productivity and that after the war it increased their returns to the investment in the private sector and so it created a context that was done during the war that said we had public spending provided a context with higher returns. this is an important point. in general, we've got this notion that the sector is complementary to the private investment. i mean, there is a lot of things that people will do if they believe there is an adequate transportation network if they believe that they are going to have skilled workers available because they have had good education to be sure. >> i tend to strip down to the minimal story and would be just about the debt and of course what we are doing right now we have states and government cancelling infrastructure proje
. and millions in lottery ticket to go to education to make our kids smarter, today, sadly, they are only getting dumber. while we open our hearts let's not lose our minds. the folks deserve better to be locked out of a lockbox, and to be taken by greedy politicians who find other uses on the backs of that. not fair, not right. not remotely the thing to do. to staten islander john d'backo who knows of what i speak. he took matters in his own hand with his brother and buddies, made things right, here is john on the phone with the story. you quickly seize the initiative and did a lot more on just a local level. than fema. >> well, neil, as you know my house was affected my family was, but after stabilizing our situation we took a look around two days later, and we saw a bunch of federal response, out there with clip boards taking notes but we did not see boots on the ground helping people. yes my brother derrick and a few of hour close friends got out there, and started up a volunteer 100% grassroots effort, mobilized within a day or two over a hundred volunteers, and at this point we probably take
to establish a democracy and rights of all individuals. dagen: kc mcfarland. connell: $5 billion in education cuts, if there is no debt deal with another part of this we will take up with union leader randy wine garden in a few minutes. dagen: john boehner meeting with the treasury secretary right now about trying to broker some deal. we will hear from john maynard this hour and you can catch it here. look at the oil market again, tensions rising in the least and the price of oil rising as well, $80 a barrel. you know how painf heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. dagen: you want to make money? that guy is not connell mcshane. [talking over each other] connell: rather make money while we sleep which putting somebody to sleep -- charles: i like temperature edict. the housing come back, everyone associated with housing does very well except the mattresses, and the stock is extremely % oversold an
. joining me this morning is meg, the president of the national education association of virginia. we also have national nea representative dennis roikle with us as well. thank you for coming in so early this morning. >> good to be here. >> i want to start with you. overing picture, -- overarching picture, what is the big picture? what can we stand to lose because of the cliff? >> if nothing is double, it will be across the -- is done, it will be across the board cuts that translates into $4.8 billion. it will impact nine million kids, including 80,000 in head start. it will take a million dollars out of special education and we'll do awfully those cuts to kids and education so the wealthiest 2% of americans can have a tax cut. doesn't make sense. >> you're talking about spending on the federal level. you have to think about the money flowing through local coffers. fairfax county, the biggest school district in our region but a lot of people at home might be surprised that a quarter of kids are on reduced or free lunches. can they get by without those? >> they can't. when we look at the cu
, and i want to give our children the kind of education they need. i want to lead the world in research, technology, and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads, bridges, and our schools. i want to do this by bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [applause] we have important decisions to make. our ultimate goal is to get our long-term deficits under control in a way that is balanced and fair, and that will be good for businesses, for future generations. i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we will have to raise more revenue, cut out spending we do not need, building on the spending cuts we have already made, and if we combine those two things, which can create a path where america is paying its bills while being able to make investments in things we need to do like grow infrastructure. we know how to do it, but in washington nothing is easy, so there is kind to be some prolonged negotiations. all of us will have to get out of our company's films to make tha
or lose them. nationwide, about $800 million went unclaimed last year. that money goes to education or other programs at the discretion of the state. you know, some states allow winners to remain anonymous. not arizona. here, you're not required to accept your winnings in the form of a five-foot check, but your name and your hometown are made public and as soon as that happens, diane, these winners will find that they have a lot of new friends. >> i'm sure you're right. thanks so much, david. >>> and now, we move onto a health alert about a popular drug and particles of glass found in the pills. 4 million americans rely on this generic version of the drug lipitor to control their cholesterol. and tonight, the manufacturer of that drug has stopped production. abc's david kerley tells us more. >> reporter: the company that produces more than 1 in 3 generic lipitor pills taken in this country has shut down all production. the problem? ranbaxy can't figure out how small glass particles, the size of a grain of sand, have gotten into its generic pills. the contamination has not led to any
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
was in "philadelphia." that was my hiv education. i heard have o iv users and prostitutes. sometimes it is hard to tell them apart. that's the dalily dose annal. i had to be responsible and grow up and have no choice. i have a certain order i have always taken them in. it's weird but got to do it. i take seven horse pills each and every day of my life to combat the hiv that is living in my body. i experience side effects from nausea, diarrhea, upset stomach, probably why i'm single, mood swings. the list goes on and on. sometimes side effects from those medications and i have to take medication for the side effects. so i would say the most pills i've taken in one day have been about 36. >> 24 more hours. then, i've got to take it again. you never get used to taking that medication. every single night at 10:00 p.m. is a reminder of the girl at 19 years old who was scared to stand up for herself. people have turned their back on me. they think hiv is contagious. they think they are different than me. we all had sex. i had friends that had sex and got pregnant. friends that had sex and got stds. we all in
people in the room and i am proud of the will of my law school in educating people like he weifang and other chinese scholars over the past three decades. we need to be as clear eyed as possible. historically, chinese reformers and some of their foreign friends have taken too unnuanced a view. this has made reform in china more complicated. the progress we have made is not inevitable, but often the result of hard-fought battles. it is helpful to underscore how even today it is a challenge to maintain the rule of law. law, by its nature, is dynamic. society changes and requires constant vigilance. i cannot resist one anecdote. the dean of one of the great chinese law schools was visiting me in boston a decade ago. we went to dinner and he said, can i ask you something personal? i said, of course. he said, this is a private, intimate question. i was trying to figure out is this salary, is the religion, is it politics? he leans across the table and says, professor, the separation of powers business -- you don't really believe it, do you? [laughter] he was amazed when i told him it was
teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. maybe you want to incorporate a business. or protect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. >>> have you joined the "politicsnation" conversation on facebook yet? i hope you will. speaker boehner's decision to finally a woman. diane says, he must have looked through one of mitt's binders of women. that's a good one. and linda said, if women were in charge of all of the committees, they might be able to get something done. we'll have a lot more on boehner's new chairman. but, first, we want to hear what you think. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and "like" us to keep the conversation going long after the show ends. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm
will be to those women who may be upper-middle-class or college educator d'or affluent women. other books deal with -- you get what i am saying. diversity within what it means to be a modern day america women that oftentimes gets lost in the discussion when we just talk about women. how much does that matter? class and race are still important issues in united states, and may more powerful lead the final women and robert kennedy than the fact of being a woman? >> my generation, the women's movement was accused by the next generation of not being sensitive enough, that was upper-middle-class movement, not being sensitive enough to gay and lesbian or for women or women of color, and all those things to play a role, the press loves to divide us like the mommy wars, working women versus at home moms. the truth is most women go through different stages of life i had little memories of the brownies i baked and pickle vat pickled. every time you generalize about women you leave somebody help. we can't have the conversation unless we do. we have to be sensitive to. o women in upper management can nego
schools more competitive and at least one education watcher is hearing all of this and worrying about the costly fixes and wondering, if we are just compounding the problem. our guest is from the education action group much the longer you are in school the more you are inclined to remember what you learn, the smarter you get, the more competitive our kids get and on and on. >>guest: that seems good on its face but you have this notion that quantity is better than quality. what states need to look at is quality. the type of instructor, are they effective? ineffective? the trouble is, we have fought been able to determine that because we don't have a good evaluation system for teachers and unions are blocking that and protecting ineffective teachers. >> there is no guarantee that the districts that the effective teachers will teach more? >>guest: no, if you have ineffective teacher it doesn't matter how long your kid in there. what you need to focus is on teacher quality. what makes an effective teacher? that is what they should focus on. >>neil: leak you i travel a bit and around the w
1 in 80 a member of the incidents cited by the cdc will realize win over educated and under or unemployed adults are brought into the welfare or this is not only an unnecessary but also critically unfair to a large group of people in our society. to prevent the scenario, changes must begin now. mercyhurst is dedicated to preparing ala graduates for productive careers. we have tried to develop partnerships and have with the verizon foundation, and other private donors. the next up for the aim program is to fund and launch the end ship program for seniors and provide -- internship program for seniors and provide programs that prepare them for the workplace. the program has been cited as a model program and has implemented a majority of the innovative components of the program with limited resources and opportunities beyond the commitment of university. is our hope is strong consideration is made for allocations of government resources to fund programs like the initiative at mercyhurst which assist students not only in achieving a college education, but help them to become prod
for college education as well. >> dealing with the mortgage interest deduction would hurt the middle class. >> if you take it in isolation. it depends how you balance it off. the rubric for us is, in has to be balanced. it has to be fair. it has to be comprehensive. it should be on the table to be discussed. we do not think that randomly you can pick things out, without understanding the unintended consequences that would provide. >> on the mortgage interest deduction -- i have a bill setting out there, trying to garner some republican support, that takes away the mortgage interest deduction for yachts that count as second homes. mr. larsen is talking about a schoolteacher trying to make sure it is affordable to buy a home, while there is a mortgage interest deduction available to people who buy yachts. that is coming from the person who represents the land of 10,000 lakes. i do not see a yacht in minnesota. that is the type of reform we are talking about. instead of signing on for that, they come to the middle class. that is where the frustration and fairness lies. >> we have heard from y
with one purpose in mind -- to educate citizens, community groups and policymakers about the positive impacts of choosing locally owned businesses. it is a network of locally owned independent businesses, community organizations and citizens that's grown to more than 3,000 local business owners. studies have shown that shifting just a small percentage of our shopping dollars to locally owned businesses could keep millions in our communities. this is something to think about as the holiday season approaches. instead of going to a chain, why not branch out and get your coffee at safari cafe on south port or get a hotdog at jean and june's and buy a few holiday gift at a local shop as well? local businesses help thriving communities. i'm glad to have local first chicago fighting for ours. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is rec
at the domestic cuts. educational programs including special education will be cut by $2.3 billion medicare payments to hospitals cut by $5.6 billion. prescription drug benefits lose $591 million. on the defense side, across the board 9.4% cut regardless of the program's merit. defense department operations and maintenance loses $3.9 billion in 2013. air force and navy aircraft purchases get cut by more than $4.2 billion. that is why some are calling cutting with a machete instead of a scalp pull. shep? >> shepard: stocks closed higher after a choppy day of trading. dow industrial average eked out 4 point gain over uncertainty about fiscal cliff thing. weakest spending report since may. a lot of storm out of that. according to the commerce department, spending dropped .2% last month. that's down a point or i sudden say 8% jump in september. analysts blame the super storm as i mentioned. its aftermath could cut economic growth for the rest of the year. syria is more isolated than ever tonight with the internet and phone lines down across the nation for the second straight day. government and
the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to
achievements, i have to tell you that what really moves my heart is what you have done for education, for kids in new york city and around the world, the 30 countries you've been to, the school programs you have initiated especially as we do less and less music education in our schools. i want to thank you for that. >> thank you very much. it's a blessing. >> talk to me about this anniversary and the importance of a quarter century of jazz at music center at lincoln center. >> i think we've had the opportunity to work as a community and meet with people all over the world, really, for the purposes of using jazz and the arts to uplift people and bring them together. and the education programs have been so well received. we have about 12 of them that cover kids of all ages from our little infants to jazz in the schools, we're going to be in -- we'll do 120 performances in the new york city public schools alone and we have essentially ellington, a high school jazz band festival and jazz competition we've been doing for 18 years and it's really been a blessing for parents and kids, so pane of our
increasing education. very educated people tend to not like trial and error. productivity drops and the rate of innovation drops. tavis: you mentioned the uk. how does this notion of "antifragile" apply in a place like egypt right now? >> the way i was complaining about egypt before the arab spring. when you suppress political life -- political life loves volatility. switzerland is a perfect place where you have volatility at the municipal level, but nothing of talk. the exact perfect on stable system is like saudi arabia or egypt. egypt before the arab spring, we had no information for 40 years. no information. a system artificially stabilized and you have hidden risks under the surface and you do not know what they are. that is what happened with the arab spring and now we are seeing things and it may turn into a total mess. the system is fragile last by depriving it from some rigid depriving it of political ofatility -- depriving it political volatility. tavis: doesn't always lead to greater strength? >> you want to -- does it always lead to greater strength? >> you want to favor the syst
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
for education the federal government will tax the winnings at about a quarter. so they'll make a lot of money out of this. unfortunately in the interest of full disclosure, larry, i think think the winning tickets have about been bought here in dallas. right now i hate to tell you, i think i've got them. >> fess up, jay, how many did you buy? full disclosure? transparency. >> only five. but i may be here a little longer. >> if you win, you're not going to retire, are you? >> i'd never retire. a lot of people say this already, i'd probably be pretty tough to work with if i do win. >> now, let's break down the numbers on this powerball jackpot. they're still selling tickets at blistering rate, 130,000 per minute. let's assume the final prize tonight will be ds 600 million. that's just an assumption. if up choose the cash option, if you win and you choose the cash option, we'll calculate you'll keep $393 million. if you live in new york city, federal, state and city taxes will take you down to $223 million. so you keep 57%, you give uncle sam 43%, you still have the $223 million bucks. it's a pr
deals with education. guest: this can about during the stimulus. this is a tax credit for education expenses. it expires at the end of the year unless congress extends it. host: when do these impacts take place if nothing is done in december? guest: most of these end at the end of 2012. this would affect people in january. host: what is the benefit for the treasury department? guest: the treasury would get more money. that is money that is no longer coming into the treasury. it is real money. the child tax credit claims in 2009 totaled about $20 million. you can get a sense of how much on the treasury would have gone if that credit were not in place. host: is there a sense of what this has cost the treasury? guest: several hundred billion dollars. host: is a large part or is this a side issue as other things get debated? guest: most of the discussion is what happens to the top two tax rates. that's where most of the political attention is right now. these are important issues for families. they haven't quite gotten the attention yet. host: lower income, middle income, that is where
grow jobs, but we can decrease foreign competition. it makes no sense to educate the world's best and brightest and require them to go home and be our competition. we do not win in that case. the way we when is we keep the best and brightest here, american and foreign, and we grow opportunity and create jobs. this is a great step. this is the first piece of reforming immigration. this is the first piece of -- it is immigration and economic opportunity in one step. i was glad to see people from the other side of the aisle step over and support it. >> what was your reaction to what the president said yesterday. >> that is not a serious offer. they are asking for $1.60 trillion in tax hikes. nowhere near that number in spending reform. we have always said we want to fix the problem. we want to make sure we get a hand on the unfunded obligations. we want to stop the spending problem so we can fix the deficit. we want to get people back to work, which is why again, we take the position that raising tax rates is absolutely not something that helps get people back to work. >> what was th
wanted to be with his son but he also wanted to expose him to a european education and to the world of international affairs, and they went to stay with benjamin franklin, and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside of paris at the time coming and john quincy, john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. and within several months he was speaking french fluently. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15, he could speak four languages fluently. he'd already studied classical, latin and greek, he could write latin and greek. he was gifted in foreign languages that when a family friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spend
. and the other thing was that frankly governor brown used education as a hostage, saying that it was necessary to avoid almost 6 billion in cuts to education. i don't accept that. there were a lot of things he could have cut. there are a lot of things that are not necessary and i mean the bullet train is one glaring example. but the fact of the matter is --. neil: was an effective issue and he won on it. >> he did, there is no question about that. neil: governor davis, let me explore that with you a little bit more here. now there is this idea that maybe this is a trend? we certainly see it in washington the president did get reelected you argues as some republicans have, all that happened the status quo remains of the having said that you could make a argument the president won support for going ahead on hiking taxes on wealthy. wealthy folks might disagree but he won endorsement for that. democrats are seizing on this now in washington saying this is justification for a lot more tax hikes. look at california, they're doing it, seems to be working. what do you say about that? >> well i don't
they tend to be ill educated and poorer and those statistics are there, but at the same time aren't they the very people that need a bit of hope. because it is false hope. that is the problem. they take the same amount of money and invest it. and so we are teaching people that a game of chance with low probability of winning is actually the way of winning your destiny today. instead of working hard and leaving laid. >> i want to bring in two men opposite sides of the powerball. it gives false hope and it should be cancelled. >> the option would not allow that, it is important that we continue to talk about the lottery. it is not an in vessvestmeninve. anybody that is spending too much will be the first to say don't play. get help or you know someone that is do that go. every lottery has a website that you are doing well. >> explain to me why you don't agree? >> a lot of folks have been calling this powerball fever. state lotteries represent one of public policy failures of the last 40 years. this is a government program that is based on pushing citizens into personal debt. it has
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